30 Days of Wild Turkey: Day 3 (Wild Turkey 101 – Austin Nichols)

Wild Turkey 101

Chapter 1, Part 3.

Over the month of November 2017, Flight Club will be bringing you “30 Turkeys in 30 days.”  Each day, we will post a review of a different Wild Turkey product.  Throughout that journey, we will provide you with background information on the company, the products and the people behind the products, all of which we hope create a better understanding of what Wild Turkey brings to the world of bourbon.  A table of contents for each of these posts can be found here.

We recently brought you Part 1 of this Chapter 1 of Wild Turkey Month, with company history and the evolution of the 80/81/101 proof products.   Today we sample a circa 2006 bottle of Wild Turkey 101.

Wild Turkey 101 Review (2006) (Sampled by Scott Hill and Stephen Netherton)

Nose:  This bottle drinks hot, with more acetone than we would like. But behind the acetone is the familiar sawdust, some delicious red apple and apricot notes, and rich butterscotch.  The butterscotch/caramel notes combine with the spice and fruit for almost a holiday caramel apple smell.  (4/5)

Palate:  Caramel, along with red apple peel, rye spice and pepper.  Warm, and much of the acetone is gone.  (3.5/5)

Finish:  Medium in length.  All spice, pepper and rye spice.  Caramel (3.5/5)

Overall:  While we imagine the even older Turkey’s have even more dusty/musty oak notes, the butterscotch notes on this Wild Turkey 101 is unlike anything we see on the market today.  The butterscotch is rich, and balances the heat and baking spices almost perfectly.  A solid pour (4/5)

Value:  You can still find many of these late 2000’s/early 2010’s Wild Turkey 101 “Austin Nichols” bottles on shelves.  The are generally a bargain find, with 750 ml and 1 liter bottles being in the low to mid 20’s.  Even better, you can still find 1.75 liter “handles” of these on shelves, for around $35.  These are rich, thick, spice and delicious.  (4.5/5)

“This Wild Turkey 101 is unlike anything we see on the market today.  The butterscotch is rich, and balances the heat and baking spices almost perfectly.”

Scott Hill

Scott is a co-founder of Flight Club and a frequent writer and reviewer on the Club’s blog.

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